Ebib is a program for managing BibTeX and BibLaTeX databases that runs inside Emacs. Ebib provides functions with which you can select a key from the database and have it inserted directly into your LaTeX text. Similar functionality is available for Markdown and Orgmode.

Ebib provides the standard capabilities that one would expect from a BibTeX database manager: .bib files can be opened, modified (adding, deleting, modifying entries), searched, and saved. Apart from the basics, Ebib has quite a few extra features that make managing your Bib(La)TeX files easier.

Features

General

BibTeX / BibLaTeX

Databases

Searching

LaTeX integration

Miscellaneous

Screenshots

Visually, Ebib is not very spectacular. But to get an impression of what it looks like, you can look at the following three screenshots. The first shows Ebib’s standard lay-out, with the list of entry keys in the top window and the fields of the currently highlighted entry in the bottom window. The field values displayed in a greenish colour come from the cross-referenced entry. (The colours Ebib uses are inherited from the current colour theme, but they can be customised independently.)

In the second image, which uses the alternative vertical layout, the string ‘Reuland’ is highlighted as the result of a text search. The third screenshot shows the strings buffer, where you can edit the @string definitions in the database.

screenshot 1 screenshot 1 screenshot 2

Manual

The complete user manual for Ebib is available in html format here.

Installation

The easiest way to install Ebib is to use the Melpa package archive. This and other installation methods are described in the manual.

If you want to download the source, you can clone the git repository for Ebib, or get a tar ball from the Github releases page.

Note: if you’re upgrading from Ebib 1.x to the latest version, there are a few things to consider. See the manual for details.

Support

The quickest way to ask questions or report issues is to use the Github issue tracker. Alternatively, send me an .

Joost Kremers (last modified: 05 Feb 2018)